Right of public access

The right of public access is a fantastic opportunity for all of us to roam freely in nature.

You make use of the right of public access when you go for a walk in the forest, paddle a kayak, go climbing or just sit on a rock and think. Usually it is completely natural for us. In order for everyone to enjoy nature, we need to take care of nature and wildlife and show consideration for landowners and others who are outdoors. We can sum this up with the phrase ”Don’t disturb – don’t destroy”

Organised outdoor life
Adventure tourism and other organised outdoor life have tremendous opportunities to make use of the right of public access for activities. The right of public access can be used commercially and by many users simultaneously. Those who organise activities on another’s land bear a great deal of responsibility. The very best way to proceed is for the organiser to make contact with the landowner, municipality and county board before the activities begin.
• Obtain the necessary proficiency
• Choose a suitable location
• Implement measures for security and prudence
• Inform participants about the right of public access

In nature close to population centres
In nature close to population centres the right of public access is all the more important. It enables many people to take part in nature activities close to home without going away. In populated areas many people live side by side, sometimes in crowded spaces. The right of public access makes it easier for all of us to coexist in nature in a respectful manner and to avoid conflicts and wear and tear on the land.

No motor vehicles on the ground
There is no right of public access for motorised vehicles. According to Terrängkörningslagen (terrain vehicles law), it is forbidden to drive cars, motorcycles, mopeds and other motorised vehicles on bare ground in the terrain. Nor is it permitted to drive motorised vehicles on private roads that are closed to motorised traffic. Such restrictions must be indicated by road signs.

Protected nature areas
In national parks, nature reserves, Natura 2000 sites or other protected areas, special rules apply. Sometimes the right of public access is limited, sometimes expanded. Information is posted at the entrances to the parks or other protected areas.

To take part of complete information in english go to Naturvårdsverket.se.